Sunday, June 14, 2015

Laureen's Submission (part 4)

This is part 4 of Laureen's Submission. Here are the links to part one (start with the writer), part two (focus on the Acquistions Editor), part three (focus on the Publisher).


"Leanne reading on the ferry"
by Byron Dyck

Wrapped in a cocoon of blankets, earplugs maintaining silence, eye mask ensuring darkness, Jon Torgelson snored. He was enjoying the extra hours of sleep the weekend provided. Laureen inched out of bed. For her, it was a normal workday. She made a pit stop in the kitchen to grab a quick bite. Then, still in her pyjamas, hair and teeth unbrushed, she stumbled down the hall and into her writer's den. Laureen wrote for a couple of hours before deciding to take a break and survey her email inbox.

"Oh, look, another rejection letter," she mumbled when she found the email from Knight's publishing house. "I'll just give it a quick read." But the words confused her. What? It can't be. I must be reading it wrong.

She heard noises in the kitchen, followed them and found her husband pouring coffee. "Jon, I need you to read something out loud to me."

"You need me to... What?"

"Read something."

He followed her to her computer screen.

"Ms. Laureen Torgelson," he read aloud. "Please send us," Jon paused as he felt the full weight of what he was reading. "The complete manuscript." He was so proud of her; he wrapped his arms around her and they held one another. Then he said, "One step closer."

And she knew he was right. This isn't acceptance, she told herself, not yet. It's merely an opportunity.


The End

Thank you for reading my short story. I hope you enjoyed it.

More:

8 Ways to Support the Writer in Your Life by Robbie Blair

Sharing my author journey...
Last week I worked to transform a novel into a novella. I did this to offer this work to a larger audience. This transformation is delicate work...
photo by Leanne Dyck

I must cut words without leaving any holes. I must cut words without leaving readers behind. And this requires a fine balance between cutting words and adding them. 
When I shared my goals on this current project with a friend, she commented, "It's like creating a new manuscript."
And she's right.
I hoped to complete the manuscript last Friday. And I'm pleased to report that I achieved this goal. 
This week I will read the manuscript over checking for story flow and ensuring that there are no holes.
Current word count:  approximately 12,000 words.

6 comments:

Darlene said...

It is always a good exercise to shorten a piece of writing. I find it very difficult but am always happy with the end result. That is when I realize I use too many unnecessary words. It is tighter and cleaner. Good for you and best of luck with the novella!

Leanne Dyck said...

Thank you for the encouragement, Darlene.

In this case, the novel and novella are really two different animals. The novel explores the story in more detail. The novella is far more focused.

Laurie Buchanan said...

"It's merely an opportunity." Amen siSTAR!

Leanne Dyck said...

Thank you, Laurie. : )

tess said...

I once condensed a story from 900 words to 500. I thought I'd be sick doing the process The main story didn't change, but I hated cutting out a thing or two. Still, the satisfaction I felt was heady.

Leanne Dyck said...

Thank you for your comment, Tess. I'm pleased to report that I've finished the transformation. I now have both a novel and a novella that I'm very proud of. They resemble each other but truly are two separate stories. I'd highly recommend this writing activity to all authors. I found it far more fun than painful.